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Posts Tagged ‘Moses’

“You shall not steal.” ~ Exodus 20:15

This command is pretty self-explanatory.  I think we all know what stealing is – taking something that belongs to someone else.  I have not really struggled with stealing in my life but I have stolen things before.

The two instances I can distinctly remember were both when I was young.  The first, I was about six years old and my friend had a doll I wanted.  I stuck it in my shirt and thought no one would notice as I was leaving her house.  I was caught.  The second time I stole lipstick from a store because my friend encouraged me to and when I walked out the alarms went off.  I am pretty sure that is the last time I ever tried stealing anything that did not belong to me.

Still, as I meditated on this verse this morning, I began to consider ways in which “good moral Christian people” do steal from one another in ways we may not realize.  Not materially – other ways.

I looked at the other commandments in order to put it in perspective.

With the first and second commands, if we break them we steal what belongs only to God – namely our worship – and give it away to other, lesser things, people, etc.  When we take the name of the Lord in vain we steal God’s honor by failing to respect him appropriately.  When we refuse to rest we steal God’s time filling it with earthly things or work in our own strength apart from him.  It is pride that causes us to steal time from God and refuse to rest in Him.  We steal honor from our parents when we break the fifth command.  We steal life when we break the sixth command.  We steal someone else’s spouse when we break the seventh command.  We may also steal another’s purity or steal affections and attention that belong to someone else.  When we bear false witness we steal another’s good name and reputation by the evils of slander, gossip, misrepresentation, and purposefully misleading others concerning their character.  Lasting, when we covet we steal the encouragement and love we should for others and fail to give it to them out of jealousy.  Jealous people always seek to bring down, discourage, avoid and injure the party of whom they are jealous.  I have encountered many jealous people who refuse to build up, love, or even know others simply due to their own covetousness.

Therefore, stealing is so much more than taking material things – although it is that.  I personally would rather have my lipstick stolen before my reputation.  But the latter is what “good moral Christians” in the church do again and again to one another by gossip, slander, and jealousy.  God help us.

Amen.

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numberone

Finally, I made it.  Exactly halfway between slavery (Exodus 1) and glory (Exodus 40),  right smack dab in the middle, we find Exodus chapter 20.  Herein lies the ten commandments.  Halfway between slavery and glory, we find the law.

God begins his face to face meeting (well, more like face to finger…isn’t that just like a father?  Pointing his all-knowing finger and writing down the very important instructions we children need to obey?)  with Moses, by telling him two things.

The first thing God does is remind Moses exactly who He is and what good He has done.

And God spoke all these words, saying, “I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery. ~Exodus 20:1-2

He then proceeds to give a huge, all encompassing law beginning with the ten commandments and extending to every aspect of Jewish life for the next eleven chapters and for the better part of the following book of Leviticus as well.

So, just so we are clear, God literally spoke all of these words.  They were His ideas and it is His authority that both establishes and upholds them – not mine.

Command number one:

“You shall have no other gods before me. ~Exodus 20:3

I have to be honest.  I had to stop right there, close the book, and spend a few days just thinking on what it would look like for me to have no other gods.  What if, truly, God was my only God.

In other words, what do I need to put away?  What have I elevated above or equal to Him?  How would my life change if He truly were my one, my only, and my greatest above all else, God?

I do not want to assume He is just because I want Him to be or because I wish he was.  I do not want to pay lip service to this commandment because it is the right Sunday School answer.  I want to know what it really means to cast down my idols.  I want to investigate what those idols might be and find real, practical, tangible ways to tear them down and remove them from my life.

The hardest part is when idols are good and necessary things, people, or places – gifts, even – from God Himself.  It is balance, affection, and attitude that generally makes the difference between whether something is becoming an idol that is being used for my glory or whether it is being being used rightly for God’s glory.

Consider those things and people and places and talents and gifts that you most enjoy.  Consider whether they have an appropriate place in your life or if God has reason to be jealous of the affections you are offering to them.  Because it is not a matter of saying, “I only believe in the One and Only True God.  Of course, I have always believed that.”  No.  It is a matter of living our entire lives in worship and sacrifice to Him alone in all things at all times.

That is what it means to have no other gods.  It truly is a daily battle of balance and being-ware.  That process starts with remembering exactly who He is and what he has done.

 He is the Great I Am, Creator of the Universe!  He has delivered us!  Let us love and serve Him accordingly.

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moses-on-the-mountain-01w-10x7

It was the third day.  The people had prepared themselves for the coming of God.  They had been given very strict instructions – lines not to cross lest they die.  In Exodus 19:16, we find the people of God awaiting his coming.

Come he did, along with thunder, lightning, a thick cloud, and very loud trumpet blasts.  Can you even imagine standing there?

There have been times in my life when the Lord has called me to do things that were very intimidating; uncomfortable; even scary.  As I went full of fear, in that moment before I saw him, I remember how I felt.  Although afraid, every second guess of why I should just forget it was silenced by two things: 1. knowing with absolute certainty his voice and 2. knowing I was prepared.

Knowing we have spiritually prepared ourselves before facing a spiritual event gives us confidence when we are afraid and do not understand what God is doing.

Have I prayed?  Have I heard from God beforehand?  Have I fasted?  Have I waited for his instructions?  Have I obeyed in as much as I already know?  Am I continuously listening for Him?

If these answers are yes, that go time moment is far less dreadful.

Here, even the mountain was trembling.  The trumpet was becoming increasingly loud.  It was then that Moses spoke and God answered.  He answered in thunder.  The Lord came down onto the mountain and Moses alone went up to him.

Matthew Henry notes, “Now, at length, comes that memorable day, that terrible day of the Lord, that day of judgment, in which Israel heard the voice of the Lord God speaking to them out of the midst of the fire, and lived…Now it was that the earth trembled at the presence of the Lord, and the mountains skipped like rams, that Sinai itself, though rough and rocky, melted from before the Lord God of Israel.  Now it was that the mountains saw him, and trembled, and were witnesses against a hard-hearted unmoved people, whom nothing would influence.” 

All this preparation, all this warning, all this waiting, all this fearful pre-meeting, and what does God tell Moses when he finally gets to the top of the mountain?

Hey, Moses!  How are you old buddy?  Let’s do lunch?!

No!  God tells Moses to go back down and tell the people the very same things he has already thoroughly told them and warned them about.

“And the Lord said to Moses, ‘Go down and warn the people, lest they break through to the Lord to look and may of them perish.’ “ ~Exodus 19:21

Moses is still huffing and puffing from climbing the mountain.  He has to be like, um, God.  You already told them that stuff.  You made me draw lines and limits around the mountain before I came up, remember?  We prepared our garments.  We did not go near our wives.  Remember, God?  We already did that.

Now.  We can infer a couple things here.  One, God was very serious about his instructions.  Two, God doesn’t mind sending us back to do the same things over and over if they are imperative.  And three, God cares a whole lot about people.  He does not want to see them needlessly die because they are disobedient.  God is willing to run his messengers up and down mountains in order to save His people from sin.

“And the Lord said to him, ‘Go down, and come up bringing Aaron with you.  But do not let the priests and the people break through to come up to the Lord, lest he break out against them.’ “ ~Exodus 19:24

God does not even answer when Moses makes the point that what he is instructing has already been done.  In fact, he says it a third time.  God tells Moses to go get Aaron and bring him up, and, oh, by the way, Moses, don’t let the people near here or I will kill them.

God is pretty serious.  God has a way of doing things.  He has an order.  He has specific methods and he expects obedience.  If there is anything we learn from this passage, it is that God wants things done His way and he wants us to be involved.

God could have told Moses to bring Aaron with him before Moses got to the top of the mountain.  That is not the way God wanted this thing done.  This is God’s way.  If I were Moses, I would probably be thinking, “Wow.  I just climbed up this mountain in obedience and now I have to go right back down and get Aaron and say what I already said and come right back up…why didn’t God just tell me in the first place.  I don’t understand this.”

Sounds just like something a Dad would do, doesn’t it?  God’s ways are not our ways.  But isn’t it just like him to test us; to test our obedience and our faith; to meet us only to send us away to get others who need to come to Him as well?  These are the kinds of things God does while we are standing around scratching our heads trying to understand why he chose to do them in the unusual ways he so often does.

“So Moses went down to the people and told them.” ~Exodus 19:25

Moses obeyed.  Moses did not argue with God.  He told God he had obeyed and God said, obey again.  So he did, and this, for the sake of everyone else and their extremely important adherence to God’s very particular instructions here.

God’s methods are often hard to understand.  His ways are not our ways.  He uses these kind of things to test our faith, to test our obedience, to see if we’re listening, to know if we’re faithful.

And he already knows those answers.  It is we who need to know for ourselves how faithful or faithless we really are.

Do not be discouraged if you spend a considerable amount of time preparing to do exactly what God commands and when you get there he sends you back down the mountain to do the same things you just got done doing.  He may want someone else to come meet him along with you.  He wants everyone to obey.  It is in these times that he is using you, just like he was using Moses.  Moses is about to see the glory of God.  He would not have seen it apart from his amazing obedience to God’s specific instructions.

“Note, in divine things we must not covet to know more than God would have us know; and he has allowed us as much as is good for us.  A desire of forbidden knowledge was the ruin of our first parents.  Those that would be wise above what is written, and intrude into those things which they have not seen, need this admonition, that they break not through to gaze.” ~Matthew Henry

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perfection

God has just sent his people into a brand new wilderness.  He has told them two very important instructions: to remember his extreme grace and mercy toward them, and to obey Him.  He has promised that if they would but listen to Him, that he is ready and waiting to make them a kingdom of priests; a holy nation; his very own treasured possession.  Talk about making a deal they can’t refuse!  Of course, they agreed.

The next step in this “process of becoming” as we will call it, it for the prophet to instruct the people on how to prepare themselves for the coming of God Himself.

 And the Lord said to Moses, “Behold, I am coming to you in a thick cloud, that the people may hear when I speak with you, and may also believe you forever.”

When Moses told the words of the people to the Lord, 10 the Lord said to Moses, “Go to the people and consecrate them today and tomorrow, and let them wash their garments 11 and be ready for the third day. For on the third day the Lord will come down on Mount Sinai in the sight of all the people. 12 And you shall set limits for the people all around, saying, ‘Take care not to go up into the mountain or touch the edge of it. Whoever touches the mountain shall be put to death. 13 No hand shall touch him, but he shall be stoned or shot;[a] whether beast or man, he shall not live.’ When the trumpet sounds a long blast, they shall come up to the mountain.” 14 So Moses went down from the mountain to the people and consecrated the people; and they washed their garments. 15 And he said to the people, “Be ready for the third day; do not go near a woman.” ~Exodus 19:9-15

God said that these people were to be consecrated.  The way in which God instructs this to be accomplished is that they:

1. Wash their garments.  Matthew Henry notes, “When we are to attend upon God in solemn ordinances it concerns us to sanctify ourselves, and to get ready beforehand.  Wandering thoughts must be gathered in, impure affections abandoned, disquieting passions suppressed, nay, and all cares about secular business, for the present, dismissed and laid by, that our hearts may be engaged to approach unto God…It becomes us to appear in clean clothes when we wait upon great men; so clean hearts are required in our attendance on the great God, who sees them as plainly as men see our clothes.  This is absolutely necessary to our acceptably worshiping God.”

2. Have established limits set.  They must be told with an extreme amount of clarity that these are the lines we do not cross lest we receive the severest of consequences.  No compromises will be made past these lines.  No blind eyes will be turned when any person – even any animal!!!- crosses.  No grace whatsoever will be given if there is injustice done to these unbreakable rules.  The message God was conveying here through the work of his prophet’s line drawing?  YOU DO NOT PRESUME UPON GOD’S MERCY – EVER. You want stoned?  Shot?  If you cross these lines that’s exactly what is going to happen.  Try me.

3.  Do not go near a woman.  This was a matter of purity of mind and heart.  Henry says, “In token of their devoting themselves entirely to religious exercises, upon this occasion, they must abstain even from lawful enjoyments during these three days, and not come at their wives.”

This was how they were to prepare for the coming of God.  These were the things necessary to truly “be ready” to meet him.  Here, before the law was given, God came down on the third day.  In the future, before grace was given, God was raised on the third day.  In the former, God came down to tell us what he expects of us – absolute perfection.  In the latter, God is raised up to tell us what we can expect from Him – unmitigated grace.

You simply cannot get the magnitude of that without falling down to worship Him.  WOW!!!  There are no words to aptly describe what a beautiful God we serve!

Hey world!!!  Look at HIM!!!  How awesome!  How amazing!  How merciful!  How good and great and strong and wise!  That’s MY Dad!!!

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family1

After Moses delegated responsibilities to the chosen men around him, the whole company of Israel came to a new part of the wilderness.  Just 50 days (think Pentecost) after their deliverance, God moves them from one wilderness (Sin, found on the west side of the Sinai peninsula) to another (Sinai, found on the east side of the Sinai peninsula).  Lives lived in God are lives lived one wilderness after another.  Ask John Bunyan.

Now, they had overcome enslavement (Exodus 12).  They had overcome thirst in the desert (Exodus 15:22-24).  They had overcome hunger (Exodus 16).  They had overcome fatigue by working together (Exodus 17:12).  They had overcome in battle against their enemies (Exodus 17:13).  They had overcome a poor model of leadership (Exodus 18).

They had fought with God and rebelled throughout all of those victories which were given solely by the gracious mercy of God alone.  God was faithful to these most unfaithful people.  God was acting, moving, and working mightily on behalf of his people.  Matthew Henry puts it this way, “Now observe, that the maker, the first mover, of the covenant, is God himself.  Nothing was said nor done by this stupid unthinking people themselves towards this settlement; no motion made, not petition put up for God’s favor, but this blessed charter was granted ex mero motu – purely out of God’s own good-will.  Note, in all our dealings with God, free grace anticipates us with the blessings of goodness, and all our comfort is owing, not to our knowing God, but rather to our being known of him.”

So.  They’re ready to live in the shade with their umbrella drinks, right?

Wrong.  Time to camp out in…the castle?…Beach house?…Vacation spot?….No.  Time to camp out in a brand new wilderness.  The new wilderness comes complete with instructions in preparation for the instructions.  Apparently the instructions that were being given in preparation for the instructions about to be given were both profoundly important.

So what were God’s plans for this perpetually proud and imperfect people of His?

Priesthood.

Priesthood!!! What?!  Hey, guys.  I know you don’t like to listen and you’ve grumbled and disobeyed me the whole way here but you’re all gonna be my priests.  Either God isn’t as smart as he’s made out to be or He loves us in ways we cannot even fathom.

All of them, from the least to the greatest were to become a kingdom of highly honored, holy hallelujah nation of card-carrying tangible treasures for none other than the Almighty Father of all the world.

The way that this was about to happen was by:

1. Remembering the amazing love, protections, deliverance, and providence God had shown to them, (Exodus 19:4)

and,

2. Obedience to Him (Exodus 19:5)

These are the profoundly important instructions which precede the profoundly important instructions, commonly known as the Ten Commandments.

Remember God’s un-stinking-believable grace.  Obey Him.

Henry says this: “Obey my voice.  This He is said to protest earnestly to them.  Only obey in deed, not in profession and promise only, not in pretense, but in sincerity.  God had shown them real favors, and therefore required real obedience.  He assures them of the honor he would put upon them, and the kindness he would show them, in case they did thus keep his covenant.  Then you shall be a peculiar treasure to me…he expresses it in that which was inclusive of all happiness, that he would be to them a God in covenant, and they should be to him a people.”

Plain and simple.  Do this and you will be my priests; my treasure; my glory; the apples of my very eye.

What grace!!!  Do you even know who these people are?  How they’ve sinned?  The faith they’ve lacked?  The complaining they’ve done?  The pain they’ve caused God’s prophet?  The miserable, many, misguided mistake-makers they really are?  These guys were just like us!  Still, God’s words for these particular preferred people is simply this:

“Now, therefore, if you will indeed obey my voice and keep my covenant, you shall be my treasured possession among all peoples, for all the earth is mine; and you shall be to me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation.  These are the words that you shall speak to the people of Israel.” ~Exodus 19:5-6

WOW! WOW! WOW!

“They were brought not only into a state of liberty and honor, but into covenant and communion with God.  This, this was the glory of their deliverance, as it is of ours by Christ, that he died, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God.” (Henry)

Now that’s a God who redeems.  That’s a God of unmitigated grace.  That’s the God of Redeeming Grace.

So the prophet says those very words to the people and “all the people answered together and said, ‘All that the Lord has spoken we will do.’ And Moses reported the words of the people to the Lord.  And the Lord said to Moses, ‘Behold, I am coming to you in a thick cloud, that he people may hear when I speak with you, and may also believe you forever.'” ~Exodus 19:8-9

They listened.  They listened.  Of course we all know it didn’t last too very long but I’d say this is progress for a people ever arguing with God’s providence.

God is getting ready to do something absolutely incredible.  Buckle your seat belts, kids. It’s time to watch Daddy drive.

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help

Moses’ father in-law had come to visit him in the wilderness.  He didn’t just come to drop off the wife and kids and go back home.  Much fruit came from Jethro’s presence in Moses’ camp.

Firstly, Jethro asked Moses how he was.  This may seem trite, but to a leader who is ever placed in the position of asking others how they fare, being asked of his welfare was likely refreshing and encouraging.

Secondly, Jethro listened to Moses.  Here is another seemingly small detail that may mean more to this man than meets the eye.  When you are a listener of all, sometimes listening is the last thing anyone thinks to do for you.

Thirdly, Jethro rejoices and praises God with Moses for what he has done.  It is always helpful to receive encouragement in the good things God has done through you.  Far too little encouragement is found among God’s people for the ways in which he uses each of us individually.

After this time of encouragement and becoming reacquainted, Moses goes back to business as usual.  Jethro watches in curious concern as he sees Moses’ daily schedule.  He says this:

” When Moses’ father-in-law saw all that he was doing for the people, he said, “What is this that you are doing for the people? Why do you sit alone, and all the people stand around you from morning till evening?”… Moses’ father-in-law said to him, “What you are doing is not good. 18 You and the people with you will certainly wear yourselves out, for the thing is too heavy for you. You are not able to do it alone.” Exodus 18:14, 17-18

Jethro sees how Moses is conducting himself and he asks a question.  “Why do you sit alone?”  He makes an observation.  “What you are doing is not good.”

How faithful are the words of one who loves us when they say plainly what needs to be said; what no one else wants to say.  More faithful still is our willingness to hear and listen to those words of concern and love.

Jethro isn’t just there to criticize as some may think at first glance.  Moses did not take Jethro’s forthrightness and plain words of truth as harmful criticism because he knew Jethro loved him.  Moses trusted Jethro.  How much good advice do men forfeit out of mere fear, insecurity, and mistrust of the faithful friends who share it!  We must never mistake genuine concern for negative criticism lest we end up sitting alone and doing that which is not good.  Such is the lot of many leaders of old.  Paranoia has a prominent place of position among those who clutch to keep control with both hands.

No.  Jethro’s intent was never to offer his opinion in order to discourage or criticize.  Jethro had advice!  Good, wise, helpful advice for this man whom he loved, respected, and rejoiced over!  Jethro loved Moses so much that he was adamantly unwilling to turn a blind eye to things he knew would eventually destroy Moses – things that would lead to burn out, wearying of well-doing, and bury him in burden-bearing.

Jethro actually says, “Obey my voice…” Obey my voice?!  Wasn’t Moses supposed to be obeying God’s voice?  Moses, if he had been insecure, mistrusting, or prideful of the counsel of this man, may have been inclined to malign Jethro and tell him he was called to obey God alone.  But, could it be possible that God really does use men to instruct men—even when and if those men are not as gifted in the prophetic as those to whom they offer counsel?  Could it be possible that he uses more practical men to counsel his prophets and vice versa?  Yes and amen!!!  

Jethro’s advice was thus:

 Moreover, look for able men from all the people, men who fear God, who are trustworthy and hate a bribe, and place such men over the people as chiefs of thousands, of hundreds, of fifties, and of tens. 22 And let them judge the people at all times. Every great matter they shall bring to you, but any small matter they shall decide themselves. So it will be easier for you, and they will bear the burden with you. 23 If you do this, God will direct you, you will be able to endure, and all this people also will go to their place in peace.” ~Exodus 18:21-23

Hey, Moses.  Son, what you are doing is not good.  You cannot do it alone.  You need help.  Ask men to help you.

If Moses had been prideful, insecure, or less in tune with God, he would have turned on Jethro in a nanosecond upon hearing these words.  These are not, after all, easy words to hear when you’re the authority in all the land; when you are the God-ordained, called, confirmed and chosen leader who comes complete with past prophetic power plays as proof.  Can’t you just hear his thoughts?

And just who is Jethro anyway?  Some shepherd from nowhereland?  Who cares what he says anyway, right?  I’m the prophet.  He’s some worker ant with a pretty daughter.  He probably doesn’t even know God.  What does he even know?

No.  Moses does not think evil of the man who loves him when he is told the truth as many of us may tend to do in our fleshly weaknesses.  Instead, Moses listens.  Moses proves his humility by having the wisdom to listen to one who is bold enough to say hard words in efforts to help.

Jethro not only gives advice on what to do, but how to do it.  What kind of men is Moses to choose to help?  His buddies?  No.  Here, he is given criteria from a very practical man, again, ultimately for his own benefit.

The men he chooses must fear God.  These men cannot fear men.  They must be confident, courageous, and certainly not cowardly.  They are going to have to judge and confront many situations and disputes.  They cannot be cowards who duck and run at the first sign of trouble.

The men he chooses must be trustworthy.  Trust is not something a man magically gains simply by being amicable, educated, or even profoundly gifted.  Trust is something that must be proven, time and again, over a considerable period of time.

The men he chooses must hate a bribe.  These men must absolutely abhor partiality, favoritism, and pats on their own back.  These kind of men cannot be bought by accolades or personal advancement of any kind.  If they can be, they will be and the entire justice system will be completely compromised.

Matthew Henry describes them this way, “It was requisite that they should be men of the very best character.  For judgement and resolution – able men, men of good sense, that understood business, and bold men, that would not be daunted by frowns of clamors.  Clear heads and stout hearts make good judges.

Finally, Jethro concludes with the reason this must happen and a promise of sorts.  His reason: “So it will be easier for you.”  The promise: “If you do this, God will direct you, you will be able to endure, and all this people also will go to their place in peace.” 

If you do this, the fruit will be your ability to continue and peace among the people.  Inferred from that statement is, if you do not do this, you will not be able to continue and there will be division among the people.

Practical men who love prophetic men often advise them from a place of wisdom.  Prophetic men who love practical men often advise them from a place of wisdom.  Let us not despise the counsel of another based on either paranoia or a pit of hell presupposition that arrogantly assumes their gifting is inferior to our own.

Kyrie Eleison

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family

In Exodus chapter 18, Moses’ father in-law comes to see him.  He had heard of all that God had done for His people and wanted to speak with Moses first hand.

Apparently, Moses’ family had not been with him during a large portion of his ministry thus far.  His father in-law, Jethro, likely understood, not only the great importance of what God was doing through Moses, but also the great importance of Moses having his wife and children with him in any further endeavors.

Moses’ family coming with him served firstly to encourage and help him.  The very names of his sons, which are made special note of here in the scripture itself, serve to encourage and remind him of who he is.

Gershom, meaning stranger; pilgrim; sojourner, reminded Moses of his lifetime lack of belonging and future citizenship in heaven.  Eliezer, meaning God is my help or God delivered, reminded Moses of where his strength and help really lie.

Our families are called along with us as our primary line of encouragement and support – second only to the encouragement and support of the Holy Spirit – any time God calls us into ministry.

Moses’ family coming with him served secondly to be an example for God’s people on how his chosen ones ought to function in their own family.  Moses, being the chosen leader of the people of God, had a great responsibility to show them how to lead their own families and affairs to the glory of God.  This is the same reason the New Testament makes clear the importance of the leaders in God’s church having their own family in order first, before they may be allowed to lead God’s church.

 Matthew Henry puts it this way, “Moses must have his family with him, that while he ruled the church of God he might set a good example of prudence in family-government, 1 Timothy 3:5.  Moses had now a great deal both of honor and care put upon him, and it was fit that his wife should be with him to share with him in both.”

So, when Jethro came with Moses’ family in tow, the very first thing Moses did was to greet him respectfully and take and interest in their (his own) family’s well being.  As tempting as it must have been, Moses did not run out to Jethro and Zipporah (Moses’ wife) and tell them of all the amazing signs and wonders or run them over with all that God had done right away.  Instead, Moses took care to greet Jethro with the respect he was due and to ask of his welfare first.  Others first.  This is a basic, foundational principle God’s leaders must possess.

Finally, Moses shares his wonder-filled testimony with his own family, who, had previously only heard of it second, third, or tenth hand.  Henry says, “Conversation concerning God’s wondrous works is profitable conversation; it is good, and to the use of edifying, Psalm 105:2.”

Unfortunately, we have many who would disagree with both Moses and Mr. Henry.  They warn us, “Don’t talk too much about the things God has done which cannot be explained.  Do not give him glory for his signs and wonders.  Do not even mention those things that belong to the realm of the spiritual and miraculous.” Many disagree with Moses and Jethro and Mr. Henry because they fear; they doubt; they disbelieve; they envy.  Therefore, they seek to silence anyone who would share the great and mighty works of a God who will not be tamed for mere man’s comfort.

In disbelieving and discounting the works of God, those ones miss both the blessing and the benefit of rejoicing in and knowing well a God who is greater than our greatest imaginations.

As we see evident here in Moses’ own family, the result of speaking the truth about the signs, wonders, and miracles of God first hand is rejoicing and strengthening of faith.  Some might even call this instance conversion for Jethro.  Jethro heard of the good for God’s people and he was genuinely happy for them.  He wasn’t jealous or suspicious or contemptuous or unfavorable concerning God’s providence and people.  He was genuinely happy and rejoiced – even he, a foreigner.

Because the leader and his family made their table-talk of that which glorified God, they found themselves rejoicing rather than murmuring, complaining, or running down their would be friends as the people following behind and all around them were so quick to do. This leader of God’s people kept his own family spiritually healthy even when those who were following behind him could do nothing but grumble, complain, accuse, and fault-find.

Just as in the case of the Jews and the Gentiles, the tragedy for those who actually witnessed the miraculous take place before their very eyes, truly missed it.  Those closest to the wonders closed their eyes in willful blindness, but those standing by and hearing second hand were more zealous and faithful than they despite the many, many great advantages God had given them.

It seems that this entire passage is one with the intent to teach us the great importance of respect and care for good family relations and conversations among God’s people and leading by example in all those things related to such. When God calls leaders, he calls their families.  This is his chosen earthly example for proper daily living.  Therefore, let us live up to our calling as those to whom the world looks for answers.

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